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U.S.’s Energy Policy

January 7, 2012

All who say the U.S. has no energy policy are wrong!

Without exception, the U.S. has a National Energy Policy.

The policy is “To Have No Energy Policy!”

Image: compliments of metrodcliving.com, “Talking Green.”

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2 Comments leave one →
  1. January 7, 2012 12:59 PM

    Barry,

    Well…. I don’t think I could have said the above any better ! LOL Yea., That’s GOV for ya !

    As for what we at DeLagostti Industries think is the most clean, abundant, & affordable Energy that the world now has., is ….

    E2E Tech based Commercial NET 40 MW Power Plants

    http://www.delagostti-industries.com/Green%20Energy%20Emergancy%20Back%20Up%20Systems.htm

  2. Justin permalink
    January 8, 2012 2:41 PM

    I couldn’t disagree more. I think the US has a very pronounced energy policy… pronounced if you consider actions to speak louder than words. The energy conversation really can’t begin until its divided itself down into its two main pieces; energy for transportation and energy for everything else. And, energy for transportation is very clearly oil, oil, and more oil. Any company that tries to sell a vehicle able to run off of any other source (in any credible volume), quickly shows a decrease in its stock’s share price. An auto-manufacturer is going to release an electric car? Might as well necessitate them for a government bailout (thus owned by government), or heavy policy emplacements designed to make the process of approval for that car essentially impossible. A natural gas fueled engine? Next thing you know, new natural gas plants are getting approved and US stores of natural gas are more competed for such that the costs just don’t make sense.
    The energy policy for the grid is a little more open, as long as King Coal gets paid off first. Pending this, and pending that new grid source isn’t going to push the costs of electricity below the ~$0.10kwh point (at least not too far below it), it will most likely get approved and, in turn, keep the cost of energy (and, therefore energy from oil as well), at or above the cost point necessary for energy from oil to make sense.

    The US very clearly has an energy policy: More, and more… esp if that includes oil.

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