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Why is the U.S. Government Fiddling While America Burns – Fossil Fuels and Its Future?

April 19, 2011

This does not advocate burring the U.S. Flag.

Dateline April 18, 2011: Weekly U.S. Imports of Total Petroleum Products for 2011 averaged 2,519 thousand barrels per day. At the current Nymex Crude Future Price of $107.12, the U.S. is exporting about $270 million U.S. dollars per day and $98.5 billion U.S. dollars per year.

Would be nice if the budget crunchers on Capitol Hill had these extra dollars to play around with! Other than saving U.S. lives by terminating the war in Iraq and Afghanistan and removing all incentives from oil exploration to production, there is not much the government can do to save dollars. Or is it!

Using the Cost of War Counter (http://costofwar.com/en), the U.S. government is spending about $323 million per day and $118 billion a year on the War in Iraq and Afghanistan. Since this discussion is not about ideology and world politics, the purpose, necessity and long-term prospect of the war will not be debated here. Will leave with this point, since the U.S. government is will to shell out $323 million a day on the war should we not look at the cost of imported oil for about $270 be considered a war too.

The United States and other nations have been myopic and relied primarily on fossil fuels to meet energy needs. Concern about the trade deficit, foreign oil, release of greenhouse gases and air pollution from vehicles and coal-fired plants has increased interest in alternative sources, including solar, wind, and nuclear power as well as waste to energy plants.

Whatever the approach or approaches; government leaders need to shake, rattle and roll already. If not the only notion one could deduce is that with all the rhetoric expressed on the subject, Capitol Hill really does not give a dam. The blame is not solely on President of Obama, Democrats, Republicans, the Senate and the House; but on all of them.

Business and the American people can do little until the government takes a stance, if not on renewables themselves, but the real cost of petroleum. Either way, something must be done.

A recent article by Michael E. Kraft, McClatchy-Tribune, on nuclear power that appeared in the Star-Telegram summed it up quite eloquently (http://www.star-telegram.com/2011/04/16/3004691/us-needs-rigid-safety-standards.html).

“So

what should we do? For starters, we need the kind of national dialogue about energy policy that the Obama administration and Congress started in 2010 but which failed to gain traction even in the face of BP’s calamitous oil spill.

We should try again to debate the nation’s energy future, and this should include a thorough evaluation of all major energy sources as well as a commitment to invest in the most promising new technologies.

President Obama has strongly favored such investments, but most congressional Republicans have opposed them. Bipartisan cooperation is essential to go forward.”

Inclosing, “Government fiddles while America burns – fossil fuels and its future” describes the situation quite well.

Note: I consider it highly disrespectful and do not advocate burning the U.S. Flag.

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3 Comments leave one →
  1. April 19, 2011 9:57 AM

    All the major political parties of any country should take such a decision which will help resolve a burning issue in less possible time.
    Energy crisis will retard all development activities across the globe within a few years.
    So, as the world leader if US fail to take pragmatic decision then not only US herself the the whole world will have to pay price for delay.

  2. Clifford Goudey permalink
    April 20, 2011 6:56 PM

    I think we as a nation are not quite desperate enough. Maybe by summer’s end when gas is $5 the tone will change. Or maybe it will be another couple years. But we know it is inevitable. The only question is how exposed and helpless we let ourselves become before taking the needed action.

    All manner of excellent renewable energy projects are being stopped or delayed for the worst of reasons. Those honest citizens who are participating in the opposition fail to appreciate the consequences of not moving forward. Of course there are those behind the opposition who know exactly what they are doing – keeping their dirty, legacy energy operations profiting for as long as possible. They have no regard for the consequences.

    Unfortunately, looking at actions taken by Congress, this does seem to be a partisan problem. I wish is wasn’t because calling out one political party brings an unpleasant tone to these discussions. Fortunately (???) no side is perfect on this issue and I hope we might identify bipartisan approaches to bring fresh traction towards a sane energy policy.

  3. MJSastry permalink
    April 25, 2011 10:00 PM

    RESPECTED SIRS
    I am in petroleum job since 1982,there are many improvements scope,many were implimented and were not well shared globally
    examples
    1.CDU Distillation temp 343 in uop operated companies,in INDIAN refineries it is 375
    2.CDU distillation units have preflash towers in UOP operated indistries in INDIA old refineries not yet modified incorporated
    3.fuel&gas losses reduction,FLARE GAS prevetion (recovery is attempted)is to be intecified
    4.IN LAB production lot of separations are taking place C14,DESSUFURISED SK FRACTION PARAFFINS ARE SEND AS FEED FOR LAB PRODUCTION,NON PARAFFTINIC STOCK IS SEND BACK AS RETURN SK STOCK ALONG WITHC-14—–IT IS IN CORRECT ?
    C-14 —TO GO FOR LSHSD
    C-10 TO C-14 DESULFURISED&IN MOLECULAR SIEVE PARAFFINS SEPARATED&SEND TO LAB
    NON PARAFFINS TO BE SEND TO GASOLINE =(IN CRU–PARAFFINS ARE CONVERTED TO AROMATICS&CYCLIC COMPOUNDS)
    IN UOP OPERATED COMPANIES IT IS SEND FOR (AVIATION)ATF—IN INDIAN REFINERIES IT IS NOT DONE.

    more proces improvements can be metioned if accepted

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